No its not a Sargent 5409, but the other one?

I’ve got a very strict rule about computers. After the 2nd cocktail, I don’t return work emails and I don’t buy on ebay. But, who follows rules after the 2nd cocktail?

Apparently not me. The work rule is easy. Who wants to work once the fun starts. So I made this impulse purchase. Its 2 planes. I thought one was a Sargent #5409. It was all there, the thin casting, the steel insert in the adjustment knob, the twisted lateral and a corrugated bottom.

The problem!

The problem was the corrugated bottom was on the “other plane”.

A little bummed but I still had a decent type 3 Sargent 409. It’s got an American Beauty cutter, so I know that’s not original. I need to find out about the American Beauty part, but Sargent didn’t make a cutter back then with the round hole at the bottom of the cutter.

The other surprise was I was sure the other plane was a Defiance. But it had a corrugated sole and I didn’t think the Defiance came corrugated. Well come to find out, in 1939 (yep for 1 year) Defiance made a corrugated. Since the #1204 Defiance was made from 1932-1953, and the #1204C was only made in 1939 I’m going to assume it fairly rare.

But here is the Sargent type 3 #409 anyhow. Look for the Defiance in days to come.

If you know ANYTHING about the “American Beauty” Iron, I’d love to here from you. I know there is an American Beauty company in business today, I just don’t know if it’s the same, and they don’t do planes anymore.

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A Sargent #5418 ready for Service.

In between getting a bunch of new old planes ready for resale I decided to resurrect this Sargent #5418.

This was one of those impulse buys. It was just a base and frog that had already been refinished. Anything in the #5400 series  is fairly scarce, so I snapped it up.

This one has the 2 piece adjuster. I remade the tote from a piece of Honduras Rosewood.

Unfortunately the cutter is not the right vintage. It’s a bit newer than the plane itself.  

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What to do when you find #102 with a broken cap

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Don @ http:\\timetestedtools.com

A Sargent #410 restoration

So last time we talked about making a new mahogany tote for a type 4 Sargent bench plane I found at a flea market.

This one was a little different. The tote screw had been replaced with a larger diameter version. I’ll assume what ever happened to the original tote, also stripped the threads so a larger on was fashioned.

Also a type 4 would typically have metal knob and tote screws, but this one has brass. Were they changed when the tote screw was re-made? I’m guessing we’ll never know.

Here is the before and after pictures.

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And here are the after.

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Please visit http://www.timetestedtools.com

and also join up in the discussion at http://timetestedtools.lefora.com/

Making a Sargent Mahogany Tote

I picked up this nice #410, but it needed a Mahogany tote.

 

Comments welcomed on the forum.

Here is the original ‘Making a Tote’ page

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Keep in mind when making a Sargent tote the angle of the rod is different than a Stanley so a Stanley template will not work.

A piece of old mahogany from a friend needed some sizing.

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Comments welcomed on the forum.

Hancock Shaker Village

We took a Sunday drive. Stopped by a flea market and grabbed a nice restorable Sargent #410. A type 4 I believe.

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Then on to the Hancock Shaker Village. You have to look at the benches. What I wouldn’t give to have them in my shop. And the hand crank rotary planer is to die for.

Edwin Hahn #6 restoration before and after.

Edwin Hahn is one of the Wilkes-Barre PA plane makers. John Rumpf wrote an excellent book on the subject titled “Plane Makers Of Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania” which includes Jacob Siegley, Edwin Hahn and the Keystone Tool Works, all seemingly working together. I hope to have some more history on them posted to Timetestedtools shortley.

In the mean time here is my latest find, and First Edwin Hahn. A nice #6.

 

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And after the restoration. (you may have noticed the original post had the wrong pictures)

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If you have any information outside of the book, I’d be interested in hearing it.

Post questions or comments here or on the forum.

Can you save that cutter

This was written as a subset of Buying a Vintage Plane.

Its not unusual to find pitted cutters on vintage planes. The question becomes “can you save them”?

In some cases its possible. There are two approaches. One is the ruler trick. by applying the ruler trick, many of these cutters become usable again.

 

 

 

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Another approach is use it for a jack. Put a camber on it and sharpen it up. But first take as much of the pitting out as you can.

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Then camber it.

 

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Then sharpen it

 

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The use it!

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TimeTestedTools now has a forum.

 

Stop by and join the tool chat.

 

TimeTestedTools Forum

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A #4 surprise and its for sale.

We’ll call this a a “holy cow, I’ve been ignoring these planes” post.

This is a Millers Falls made Sears. To me it looks like crap. Why would you paint a plane red? And I could get past the body red. As a matter of fact, done properly it may look good, but please, not the cap!

But this came in a bundle. You know, buy these for that much and I’ll throw in the sears kind of deal. I have thought on it for a few days, thinking I would just sit it on the shelf until some motivation to make a lamp or something struck. After all, I try real hard to only sell “usable” hand planes.

But I’ve made a few work I wasn’t sure about, so I picked this up and looked. Frog looks decent. Casting of the bed is ok. Jeez, maybe it’ll actually work.

And not only does it work, but I’ve done absolutely nothing to this except sharpen it. I know the expression, “sharp fixes everything” but come on!

So basically this is a Millers Falls plane, with a really crappy cap. I went as far as thinking about a brass cap, but thought it would clash with the red.

Now I’m not going to pretend this a top of the line plane. The cap and iron is not one of the finest I’ve ever seen, although it did take a decent edge. Its retention probably won’t rival a new Hock, but then, a new Hock is an option.

It also needs a bit more cleanup. It still has the rust that came on it, but its minor and should clean up quick.

So if your looking for a cheap plane with reasonable results. Look no further. Keep in mind, this is Ash I’m testing it on, not some nice clear cedar.

I’m asking $25 plus the USPS charge of $12.80. See others for sale as well.

Trades always welcome!
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