Ohio Tool #122, What a Surprise


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Some times a restore comes along that just surprises the crap out of me. I’m a bit of an Ohio Tools buff. I’m not sure why, but I just started seeking out anything that has Ohio Tools stamped on it. This plane is no exception. I really believed it was beyond hope, but I could make out the Ohio Tools stamp. Had it not come with a bunch of other planes though, making it almost free, it probably would have been still sitting on the antique dealers shelf.
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Someone in its previous life had decided to clear coat it with some kind of lacquer. And we all know what happens when you encapsulate bad rust. It was rusted so bad it actually turned the clear coat a reddish color in spots.
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I figured I could get it close enough to be a book end. Even then I was a little skeptical. After all, it was looking pretty pathetic.
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But once again, I could still read Ohio Tools, so it gave me a ray of hope. Maybe it will look good sitting on my shelf.
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And it was part complete after all, and the wood wasn’t bad. That’s always a plus.
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This is the hardest strip job I’ve undertaken. I used every technique I have ever used on this particular plane. I used paint stripper, wire brushes, dremel brushes, sand blaster, scrapers, knife blades, sand paper, and soaked it in evapo-rust. Between the clear coating, the original finish and the rust, it was not giving up easy, but then, neither was I.

After finally getting it stripped, I gave it a coat of Dupli-Color Engine Enamel DUPDE1635 Ford Semi Gloss Black spray paint. The wood got scraped with a cabinet scraper and sanded to 500 grit. A coat of wax and a few coats of BLO rounded out the treatment. I only sanded the front with 500 grit to preserve the stamp.

I sharpened the blade, flattened the back, wire brushed the small pieces and put it back together.

Much to my very pleasant surprise, not only did it come out looking good, but its probably one of the best working transitionals I’ve restored to date. The mouth was tight right away, no fussing with the sole, and the blade was in very decent shape. I was a little surprised the rust had not penetrating the bottom half of the blade or the chip breaker, making sharpening and flattening much easier than most.
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Like all transitionals, the blade is a little difficult to set, and this has the extra adjustment for the blade adjuster, so it takes some fussing to get it right. I was taking some heavy shavings at first, but gradually got the adjustment down, and got some very nice thin shavings.
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I’m glad I got to bring this one home. Its found a spot next to the other transitionals in my shop. It probably won’t get used a whole lot, but it can sit proudly in retirement knowing its got back the respect it deserves.

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2 Responses to Ohio Tool #122, What a Surprise

  1. Chris P. says:

    Wow beautiful job, makes me want to go out and find a diamond in the rough. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Dave says:

    Don with that level of pitting I am surprised you were able to get the back of the iron flat. You have done it again. That looks to me to be the coolest bookend I have ever seen.

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