Not your average restore.

Union?? #4     

If tools with character is your thing, this will fit very well in your shop. I’m only guessing this is a Union, and if it is, its an early one. Its well built and works very well. The front knob bolt is similar to the Union X series. The rear tote bolt was similar but I had to replace it because someone had cut it way to short. If the Buyer would like the original I will send it. There are no markings on the base other than the size.

The tote is an experiment of mine. It came out ok. Its rosewood with some Ash reinforcement strips. It is a replacement tote, the original was trashed. The knob is the original mahogany.

As you can see, the chip breaker has some serious pitting. I thought about replacing it, but the business end is perfect, and it just fits the plane. The original cutter was a Victory replacement. (I assume replacement). It was pitted a very small amount, but enough so I wouldn’t leave it in a smoother. It now has a Stanley cutter.

The cap has a pebbled look. I almost think it may have been painted originally, but I see no evidence of that.

It has been Completely tuned and sharpened and it works very well. It will make a very good smoother for a reasonable price tag.

The before


And restored.



Yes, its for sale,

I almost hate to sell it, but I need to regain some space.


Thanks for looking.



A Jenny revival –The Stanley #37

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When she came to me, this was the condition.

(ref The name "Jenny" is unique to this plane. Since this plane is slightly shorter than the metallic jack plane, a parallel naming was taken from the asses (donkies). "Jack" is a commonly used when referring to the male donkey, and "Jenny" is a name sometimes used for the female donkey. The jenny is smaller than the jack, hence the naming of the planes. All of this is really conjecture, but it sure provides some filler for an otherwise bland series of planes.

This plane also has the step in the wood, with the cast iron frame following the contour of the wood, though not as pronounced as the #35 and #36. This isn’t a very common plane, but Stanley saw fit to offer it for some 50 years.


A soak in some BLO


Watch the cracks and checks disappear. Semi-wet sand with BLO (Tru Oil works to). It needs to jell up. I let this set over night. And the first coats of tru-oil are put on after. They will be wet sanded until I’m happy with the hidden checks. A little planing and Scraping just to remove the gunk.








Made in Germany #2200 Block Plane

I picked this plane up in a flea market for $2 or $3. I bought it because I’d never seen one, and it was $2 or $3.

An little research lead me to Tillmanns & Maier in Velbert/Rhineland.

I found some info here,

A lot of what I find is in German, so I can’t read it, but its possible these may have been in ported by Jordon.

I just wiped it down with some WD-40

An finished with a coat of Fluid Film



Any additional information would be appreciated.



Saving the #5!

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I was looking through my broken plane pile for some inspiration. I came across a #5 with some issues.

I set it on the bench for a better look. There has to be a way to save it. A little comparison to a #604, and away we go.

A way to use the original thread even though I haven’t sprung for a tap and die yet.

I decided to leave it sandblasted and clear coated. I like the greyish “gunmetal” look”

— Master hand plane hoarder. –

A type 14 Stanley #5C restored.

I don’t have any before pictures, because this beauty came with a type 20/21 frog with the folded lateral, so I wasn’t even going to do anything with it. I changed my mind more just to see how much work it would take, since it was a jack anyhow, I figured it would be ok. I thought it was strange that it had rosewood, but I didn’t think to hard on it.

On closer inspection though, I found this wonderful type 14. Based on the broken tote tip, I would say it was dropped and the original frog busted.

I had the correct frog, so its all back to normal now.

I didn’t do the tote repair, its an old repair which seems very solid. I just sanded it out and refinished, leaving the history intact.


Check out my tools for sale…..

Some Before and after pictures of a Type 2 Stanley #18

See more of my block planes here.



And After


And a recent Stanley Knuckle Plane Family Shot


Edwin Hahn #9 restoration before and after.


After my recent success restoring a Stanley type 2, I went on to a restore of an early Edwin Hahn plane. This plane is earlier the the #6 I restored.

The only before picture I have. Its sitting right next to the Stanley type 2.

It looks like this plane was made between 1902 and 1906.



And Compared to the #6


A Bedrock #607 and a Keen Kutter #K7–All in a days play

Finally, a day in the shop. These were meant as winter projects, but it’s a cold raining fall Saturday. Let do some restores.

A Bedrock #607. Before:


And after the full treatment. (If you haven’t seen it, here’s my restoration page)


Here’s the current bedrock family.


And a Keen Kutter #K7 also got the full treatment today


Thanks for stopping by.

Stop by the forum to!!

No its not a Sargent 5409, but the other one?

I’ve got a very strict rule about computers. After the 2nd cocktail, I don’t return work emails and I don’t buy on ebay. But, who follows rules after the 2nd cocktail?

Apparently not me. The work rule is easy. Who wants to work once the fun starts. So I made this impulse purchase. Its 2 planes. I thought one was a Sargent #5409. It was all there, the thin casting, the steel insert in the adjustment knob, the twisted lateral and a corrugated bottom.

The problem!

The problem was the corrugated bottom was on the “other plane”.

A little bummed but I still had a decent type 3 Sargent 409. It’s got an American Beauty cutter, so I know that’s not original. I need to find out about the American Beauty part, but Sargent didn’t make a cutter back then with the round hole at the bottom of the cutter.

The other surprise was I was sure the other plane was a Defiance. But it had a corrugated sole and I didn’t think the Defiance came corrugated. Well come to find out, in 1939 (yep for 1 year) Defiance made a corrugated. Since the #1204 Defiance was made from 1932-1953, and the #1204C was only made in 1939 I’m going to assume it fairly rare.

But here is the Sargent type 3 #409 anyhow. Look for the Defiance in days to come.

If you know ANYTHING about the “American Beauty” Iron, I’d love to here from you. I know there is an American Beauty company in business today, I just don’t know if it’s the same, and they don’t do planes anymore.



A Sargent #5418 ready for Service.

In between getting a bunch of new old planes ready for resale I decided to resurrect this Sargent #5418.

This was one of those impulse buys. It was just a base and frog that had already been refinished. Anything in the #5400 series  is fairly scarce, so I snapped it up.

This one has the 2 piece adjuster. I remade the tote from a piece of Honduras Rosewood.

Unfortunately the cutter is not the right vintage. It’s a bit newer than the plane itself.